Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging - Original Article

Association between prostatic 18F-FDG uptake and lower urinary tract symptoms assessed by International Prostate Symptom Score

1.

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

2.

Department of Radiology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

3.

Department of Urology, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

4.

Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea

Diagn Interv Radiol 2022; 28: 179-184
DOI: 10.5152/dir.2022.20677
Read: 262 Downloads: 104 Published: 04 December 2020

PURPOSE

Inflammation is known to induce prostatic growth and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) progression in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), but clinical indicators for intraprostatic inflammation other than biopsy have not yet been established. While 2-deoxy- 2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is a useful tool for investigating inflammatory conditions, prostatic FDG uptake in patients with BPH has not been elucidated. Therefore, we evaluated the association between prostatic FDG uptake and LUTS.

METHODS

A total of 391 men in their 50s who underwent FDG PET/CT during health examinations were included. Mean and maximal prostatic standard uptake values (SUVs) on FDG PET/CT were measured. Prostatic volume, focal FDG uptake, and calcification were also evaluated. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) for LUTS was collected at baseline and follow- ups. The correlation between IPSS and other variables was analyzed.

RESULTS

The mean age of the study participants was 51.7 years, and the mean follow-up interval was 39.7 months. The average of the mean and maximal SUV for prostatic FDG uptake was 1.8 and 2.6, respectively. The prostate volume was 18.5 cm3. The mean IPSS was 4.82 at baseline and 5.46 at follow-ups. Neither the mean SUV nor the maximal SUV of prostatic FDG uptake was correlated with IPSS at baseline or follow-ups. Conversely, prostate volume was associated with baseline IPSS and follow-up IPSS.

CONCLUSION

Prostatic FDG uptake did not show a significant association with IPSS on FDG PET/CT as well as at follow-ups. FDG uptake may not reflect prostatic growth in nonmalignant cases.

You may cite this article as: Kim SJ, Chang H, Youn I, Joo KJ, Ryu S, Kim YH. Association between prostatic 18F-FDG uptake and lower urinary tract symptoms assessed by International Prostate Symptom Score. Diagn Interv Radiol. 2022;28(2):179-184.

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