Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Chest Imaging - Original Article

Chest radiography and CT findings in patients with the 2009 pandemic (H1N1) influenza

1.

Departments of Radiology, Başkent University School of Medicine, Konya, Turkey

2.

Department of Radiology, Başkent University School of Medicine, Adana, Turkey

3.

Department of Radiology, Başkent University Faculty of Medicine, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Adana, Turkey

4.

Department of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology, Başkent University Faculty of Medicine, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Adana, Turkey

5.

Department of Chest Diseases, Başkent University Faculty of Medicine, Adana Teaching and Medical Research Center, Adana, Turkey

Diagn Interv Radiol 2011; 17: 216-222
DOI: 10.4261/1305-3825.DIR.3337-10.1
Read: 727 Downloads: 659 Published: 03 September 2019

Abstract

PURPOSE
To present chest radiography and thoracic computed tomography (CT) findings for patients with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) from November–December 2009 and to explore any differences compared to previously reported imaging findings.

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS
Fifty-two hospitalized patients with pandemic influenza (H1N1) were included in the study. All of the patients underwent chest radiography, and 28 patients were also evaluated by thoracic CT. Group 1 comprised 24 (46%) patients with no identified risk factors for H1N1 influenza infection. Group 2 comprised the remaining 28 (54%) patients with identified risk factors. The distribution of lung involvement, consolidation, ground-glass opacity (GGO), lymph nodes, and pleural effusion were evaluated.

 

RESULTS
Abnormal findings were observed in 85% of the patients. Bilateral lung involvement was present in 80% of the patients. The most common finding was a mixture of GGO and air-space consolidation. Lower zone predominance occurred in 89% of group 1 and 85% of group 2 patients. The involvement was observed most frequently in the peripheral and central perihilar areas of the lung in 80% of the patients. The extent of disease was greater in group 2 patients with the involvement of three or more lung zones in 62% of the patients.

 

CONCLUSION
The most common imaging finding for lung involvement was a mixture of air-space consolidation and GGO with a patchy pattern and lower/middle zone predominance. Pulmonary involvement of the disease was more extensive than that described in previous reports.

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