Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Interventional Radiology - Original Article

Prone transradial catheterization for combined single-session endovascular and percutaneous interventions: approach, technical success, safety, and outcomes in 15 patients

1.

Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology,University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

2.

Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health Systems, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

3.

Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

Diagn Interv Radiol 2018; 24: 276-282
DOI: 10.5152/dir.2018.18050
Read: 855 Downloads: 297 Published: 03 September 2019

Abstract

PURPOSE: We aimed to report approach, safety, technical success, and clinical outcomes of prone trans- radial access (PTRA) and demonstrate feasibility for procedures requiring simultaneous arterial intervention and prone percutaneous access. 


METHODS: Fifteen patients underwent PTRA, seven females (47%) and eight males (53%), mean age of 55 years (range, 19–78 years). All patients underwent PTRA for combined transarterial and posterior-approach percutaneous interventions. Variables included sheath size (French, F), type of anesthesia, arterial intervention technical success,  posterior-approach percutaneous intervention technical success, estimated blood loss (mL), fluoroscopy and procedure time, complications, and follow-up.


RESULTS: Mean sheath size was 4 F (range, 4–6 F; SD = 0.5).  Arterial interventions included transarterial embolization of renal (n=6), hepatic (n=2), and pelvic vessels (n=2), diagnostic arteriography (n=4), and embolization of an arteriovenous malformation (n=1). Posterior-approach intervention technical success was 100% (15/15). PTRA technical success was 100% (15/15). Posterior-approach percutaneous interventions included retroperitoneal (n=5) and pelvic (n=1) mass biopsies, nephrostomy tube placement (n=2), cryoablation of pelvic (n=2) and renal (n=1) masses, sclerotherapy of arteriovenous malformations (n=2), foreign body removal from the renal collecting system (n=2), ablation of a renal tumor (n=1), intracavitary injection of pulmonary mycetoma (n=1), and ablation and cementoplasty of a vertebral body tumor (n=1). The biopsies were diagnostic (6/6). There were no minor or major access-site complications.


CONCLUSION: PTRA is a safe and feasible method for performing combined arterial and posterior approach percutaneous interventions without the need for repositioning.


You may cite this article as: Srinivasa RN, Chick JFB, Gemmete JJ, et al. Prone transradial catheterization for combined single-session endovascular and percutaneous interventions: approach, technical success, safety, and outcomes in 15 patients. Diagn Interv Radiol 2018; 24:276-282.

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